The MMORPG Effect

Tuesday, January 24, 2012 | 6

The MMORPG Effect Defined :

The MMORPG Effect is classified as the negative relationship between production quality and innovation. In order to clearly define this relationship, I have provided a very accurate scientific chart.

Pick your poison. There is no correct answer.

There are numerous reasons why this relationship exists, many of which involving money directly. As a service to you, the reader, I've decided to endow my vast insights on the matter. I like lists... Let's do a list.

#1 Venture Capitalism

Blizzard created an environment where the definition of the success of a video game is derived from an obvious equation, and as it pains me to admit it, may have been the last innovative theme-park MMORPG.

Such a clearly defined model of success attracted investors to the genre like hotcakes. The people with the money always run the show so you tend to end up with a bunch of versions of the same game. The only difference is that the Blizzard staff is more experienced, and has been running the show longer. Fail.

#2 Indie Developers Aren't Real Developers

When people get together and play video games, the inevitably brainstorm about what they could do better than what's been done in the past. It's relatively easy to come up with ideas, but without the foresight of real development experience, these projects usually amount to innovative pieces of shit (see: Mortal Online).

#3 Gamers Take It

People need to expect better from these multi-million dollar companies with hundreds of developers. Thinking up new and creative ways to copy World of Warcraft does't work. This should have been obvious with the number of failuregames going up F2P.

LOTRO ISN'T GOOD! You're just poor...

Boycott this shit

Gaming celibacy is the only way you can send a message to these corporate goons. We need to face at some point that these European and independent projects just aren't ever going to cut it from a production quality standpoint.

Alternative activities : Sex

6 comments :

  1. Bah, sex is for pussies! And dicks! No, really, it is.

    I've never played an MMORPG. Once upon a time I thought that I wanted to, and that I would, but as the years went by, I never did. And now I don't want to. I prefer to read stories about other people who play rather than having to spend all that time grinding, only to occasionally have something actually interesting happen.

    Though I wonder if I would like an MMORPG where characters don't gain any additional power, and instead collect experiences? Experiences such as having done a particular quest, or visited a place, or had a certain encounter. I imagine that it would somewhat like chasing achievements, except a lot more fun.

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  2. I think that type of philosophy when it comes to MMORPGs doesn't do justice to the potential of the genre. The think that makes a MMORPG different from a normal multiplayer or single player game is the potential for unscripted encounters and unpredictable contests.

    A perfect MMORPG would enable a player to generate their own experiences rather than strictly adhering to the pre-scripted story-lines a la SWTOR. What other type of game could you be randomly attacked by a group of naked role players? Achievements are stifling and reduce from the true potential from a massively multiplayer system.

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  3. Another interesting piece, thanks for sharing your thoughts. Maybe, one day we can read your views on private servers? I mean, not private servers of a specific game but private servers as a concept. While they mostly fail miserably, they still have the power to make the shittiest Korean grindfest playable. I think I would like the read your opinion.

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  4. I may end up doing some writing on free servers. I've played a LOT of them.

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  5. I see a lot of truth in the chart. Look at year 2003 or so. Shadowbane vs Wow. One that was very innovative, had so many bugs that was almost unplayable and one that was very polished, but took ideas just from other games. Good article.

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  6. I've come to hate MMOs because I finally realized that they are incredibly boring, unimaginative, and an utter waste of time.
    The elitists in such games are so annoying to interact with. It didn't take too long for me to realize that the strongest are always the ones who pay the most. These developers have a great thing going money-wise.

    Not to mention way too much time needed to be put into a single game, just to have what...Maybe one interesting thing happen? The competition, especially on a server with elitists, isn't even fun. Because people are annoying.

    That is all. Feel free to bash my incoherence.

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